bookmate game

Podcast: Good Beer Hunting

Good Beer Hunting
733Книги14Подписчиков
GBH is not a voice speaking only from the outside looking in, but rather, from the middle of some of the most rapidly changing dynamics that any U.S. industry has ever seen. The interviews go deeper and the articles work harder to balance the culture of craft beer with the businesses it supports, shifting the conversation with our readers toward the future of the industry we love and the tenacity of its ideals.
    Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Huntingсегодня
    Beer is having a hard time these days. Category-wide, sales are down and
    interest just isn’t the same it used to be. But what if the enthusiasm that
    got us to this point—excitement that helped lead to almost 10,000 small and
    independent breweries scattered across the country—is still just as
    palpable now as it was one, two, or 10 years ago? It’s just a matter of
    looking.

    In this special episode of the Good Beer Hunting podcast, beer enthusiasts
    from around the country explain why for them craft beer still means
    friendships, new experiences, and most of all, something cool at a time
    when there’s a feeling that it might be anything but.
  • The Hunt For Craft Beer's Cool
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Huntingпозавчера
    Brewing is famously a science and an art. There are loads of technical
    aspects a skilled brewer should nail down to create something special, but
    there’s also a point where you just have to give up some autonomy. Or, at
    least accept it’s OK to play a little for some R&D. One of the most
    important things people in American craft beer have learned in recent years
    is how this also applies to their customers. A diverse menu that may expand
    beyond just beer is becoming table stakes and creativity in what kind of
    styles and flavor experiences you offer—in or outside of beer—can matter
    more than ever. You can control your taplist, but you also have to be
    flexible to what you hear and learn from people sitting at your bar.

    In this episode, we explore this idea and what it means to grow a business
    and expectations with Kevin and Britt Templin of Salt Lake City, Utah’s
    Templin Family Brewing, also known simply as TF Brewing. Since opening in
    2018, TF Brewing has become known for its lager program, including its
    award-winning flagship, Granary kellerbier. The brewery has also earned
    recognition at the World Beer Cup, where in 2024 it won gold medals for its
    coconut-guava berliner weisse and Squirrel Juicy IPA. There are other
    medals from the Great American Beer Festival and WBC, but that hasn’t
    stopped Britt, Kevin, and their team from expanding their menu and
    listening to what customers are telling them they’re interested in
    drinking. The science of their beers has been stellar and the art of
    refining what that means for drinkers continues to evolve.

    You’ll hear us talk about what it takes to feel OK about making these
    changes—which for TF Brewing has included a new wine program and successful
    cocktail menu—along with what it means to be a growing brewery in 2024. The
    value the Templins place on their staff and how those people help the
    brewery succeed is high. By the time this conversation wraps, you’ll have
    an understanding of how “family” isn’t just in the name of the business,
    but how they want to make people feel. Even in that, there’s a science to
    running a brewery that’s a business, but an art to creating a space that
    promotes imagination, community, and closeness.
  • EP-421 Kevin and Britt Templin of Templin Family Brewing
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting5 дней назад
    It’s a classic question asked first in a novel, then in music, and often as
    a half-joke pop culture reference: Can you go home again? People change
    over time, but of course, places do, too. What we’ve previously experienced
    in our hometowns and where we grew up can feel distant for a very good
    reason. Time and experience changes us all, whether we like it or not. But
    in this episode, we’re going to explore what it means to lean into this
    question and ask instead, “what does it feel like to be home, again?”

    Working through this with me is Trace and Eeva Redmond, a couple who in
    recent years took years of experience working in beer and returned to
    Eeva’s home town of Petoskey, Michigan where they’ve opened Elder Piper, a
    brewery and cidery located along the shores of Little Traverse Bay on the
    upper portion of the state’s mitten shape. As brewer, Trace brings brewing
    experience that includes stops at Michigan’s Founders and Roak Brewing, as
    well as North Carolina’s Highland Brewing. Eeva has worked in a collection
    of hospitality and communication roles in beer as well, including positions
    at Roak Brewing, Sierra Nevada, and Highland.

    Why open a brewery now, at a time when we hear about so many closing?
    That’s where we start our conversation, but it leads us to many other ideas
    and reflections about what it means to start a business in a city of 6,000,
    especially when it’s the place where you grew up. As you’ll hear, community
    connection has been pivotal to Eeva and Trace, and their story offers
    something of a roadmap of what it takes to launch a new,
    neighborhood-focused brewery in today’s market.
  • EP-420 Eeva and Trace Redmond of Elder Piper Beer + Cider
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting7 дней назад
    West Virginians take a lot of pride in their state. As well they
    should—it’s one of the most stunningly gorgeous destinations in the United
    States, albeit one that can be hard to get to, thanks to the same
    mountainous spectacle that draws people there in the first place.

    Matt Kwasniewski is a West Virginia native, as well as the owner and head
    brewer of Big Timber Brewing in Elkins, West Virginia. It’s the largest
    craft brewery in the state, with an annual output of around 6,000 barrels
    last year, positioning them solidly in the “microbrewery” category. He says
    that West Virginia’s rural location, small population, and generally blue
    collar workforce makes it an unlikely place for craft beer to thrive. But
    the state is much more than how it’s defined by outsiders. Kwasniewski has
    seen the craft beer industry grow from 10 to around 32 breweries in the
    past 10 years, and for residents, that’s a lot.

    In this episode, Kwasniewski walks us through the state of West Virginia,
    both as a local and as a brewer, and what he wishes more people knew about
    the relatively undiscovered Mountain State. For instance, they have some of
    the purest water anywhere in the country—ideal for brewing Big Timber beers
    like lagers, IPAs, and their award-winning porter that took gold at the
    2024 World Beer Cup. He’s not interested in expanding much further than his
    home state, and why should he? He wants to be the beer of West Virginia,
    and you can hear him explain why and how he plans to do that.
  • EP-419 Matt Kwasniewski of Big Timber Brewing
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting9 дней назад
    # On Becoming Hawk

    Hi there - this is Michael Kiser, founder and publisher of Good Beer
    Hunting. I’m coming to you today with a difficult message—but a simple
    one.

    Good Beer Hunting—after nearly 15 years, and at least 10 of that that I
    would consider serious years—is going on a platform-wide sabbatical. It’ll
    be indefinite. It might be permanent.

    We have some ideas for what the future of Good Beer Hunting might look
    like—and soon I’ll be working on that vision with the counsel of my
    colleagues to see where it takes us. But the earliest vision is so
    drastically different than what GBH currently is, that the only way to get
    to the other side is to make a clean break. We’ve got to clear out the
    cache. We’ve got to quiet everything down for a bit and see what it all
    sounds like on the other side of that silence.

    We’re shutting down our various content streams—the podcast, the website,
    social—ending a sort of always-on feed of content that’s been, for many of
    us writers, editors, and artists, our life’s work. And for most of us, our
    best work.

    This thing that started as my personal blog would go on to be published in
    the annual Best American Food Writing, and win multiple Saveur blog awards
    before I had the courage to start publishing other voices beyond my own. It
    began as a way to pursue my curiosity for beer, combining the beauty I saw
    in it with the strategic implications of a new wave of culture and industry
    the world over. Good Beer Hunting came from a simple idea and simpler
    execution of a blog and grew into an international publication covering
    unique stories from countries all over.

    With every major shift, from one editor in chief to another, it would morph
    into something that felt beyond any reasonable ambition. Eventually winning
    awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, Imbibe Magazine, more
    than 100 awards from the North American Guild of Beer Writers, and most
    recently nominated for 6 James Beard Awards and winning 3 of them. If I
    consider what it would mean for us to achieve something beyond all that,
    I’d have to believe in a truly insane fantasy.

    In the many years of running a beer publication that took us to the top
    echelon of all publications —literally taking podiums next to the New York
    Times, Washington Post, and The New Yorker—we’ve had to build and sustain
    an organization that simply doesn’t have a roadmap for survival in 2024’s
    media landscape. And to be clear, it never did.

    From day one, I vowed to not try and make GBH profitable, because the media
    world already showed that to achieve profitability was to welcome a certain
    kind of death—and often a shameful one. Chasing advertisers and clicks with
    listicles and promotions—and as a result, never creating anything of real
    value to anyone but the advertisers. It was a fool's errand, and one we
    didn’t follow. By not hunting down ad revenue and declining offers over the
    years, Good Beer Hunting was able to remain a personal project in a way,
    even as our ambitions continually grew and results showed what an impact
    our stories and contributors made on the world of beer and beyond.

    Instead of trying to manage our costs with advertising, we’ve been able to
    form longstanding partnerships with companies like Guinness, which has
    helped mitigate at least some of financial losses we took on every year. We
    also launched an experimental subscriber community called the Fervent Few,
    which took a meaningful chunk out of the debt and paid its dividends by
    connecting readers and fans from all over the world during the loneliest
    parts of the pandemic. But in reality, even these things combined didn’t
    cover the gaps as we continued growing.

    The challenge of expanding GBH during its rapid growth phase came from my
    own pocket, which kept our editorial team independent and in control. But
    it also guided us to this moment. Paying for writers, designers, and
    editors was a budget pulled from my own strategic consultancy called Feel
    Goods Company, which was no small thing. Each year, the costs sometimes
    crested over $100,000 that weren’t covered by underwriting partners like
    Guinness or subscribers from the Fervent Few. And in the last couple years,
    costs went far beyond that. For years, I put other important things in my
    family’s life on hold to continue supporting GBH’s growth and ambitions.

    As a father of three kids—and sometimes the only one working—that decision
    wasn’t made lightly. I exhausted myself making the consulting business
    uncommonly successful in order to keep both things afloat and growing. And
    as costly as that was in a financial sense, I’ve never regretted the
    decision to do it—and I never took a dime. In fact, there was one year when
    we more or less broke even, and with the small amount left over we gave the
    editorial team, including our freelancers, a surprise end-of-year bonus.
    More like a tip really.

    Good Beer Hunting is the longest I’ve ever done anything, and it’s also the
    best thing I’ve ever done. And it existed entirely because I wanted it to.

    But outside of anything I wanted it to become—my own pride and ambitions
    for GBH don’t really compare to the awe I feel when I look at what people
    like Austin Ray, Claire Bullen, and Bryan Roth helped it become. Our three
    successive Editors in Chief over those 10 years—each of whom shaped a new
    generation of Good Beer Hunting into an image that only they could have.
    Each of whom provided the shoulders for the next to stand on. And the
    countless writers and artists who were drawn to their leadership and the
    level of execution in our collective work—who gave us some of their own
    best work.

    I’m thinking of Kyle Kastranec from Ohio, the first writer other than
    myself, who wrote a feature for GBH, setting a high bar. I’m thinking of
    Charleston’s own Jamaal Lemon who won a James Beard award for GBH alongside
    other winners and nominees like Stephanie Grant, Teresa McCullough, Chelsea
    Carrick, and Mark Dredge.

    I’m thinking of people like Matthew Curtis, our first editor in the UK who
    turned the lights on in an entirely new country for us, and Evan Rail who
    kept turning on lights in dozens of countries since as our first
    International editor. Emma Janzen, and Ren Laforme who joined our editors
    team in the last iteration, rounding out some of the most ambitious and
    wide sweeping storytelling we’ve ever produced. Kate Bernot, who leveled up
    our news reporting to create an unmatched source of access to explain to
    readers why things matter in beer and beverage alcohol, which is now a
    growing stand-alone business unit in Sightlines.

    What felt like a fluke at first, has become something I can confidently
    own. We produced industry-changing, internationally-recognized, and James
    Beard Award winning material…consistently.

    I’m also often reminded of the smaller things we’ve done—like the blogs and
    short stories we wrote—about the politics and personal traumas of the way
    we eat, drink, and relate to each other in our families, in our
    communities, and against the injustices so many people face in an industry
    that’s ancient and profoundly immature at the same time. It’s an unlikely
    place for a beer publication to have a voice —but GBH has always built its
    scope around the perspectives of the individual souls who occupy space
    within it rather than narrowing down a profitable and popular slice of the
    beer conversation and reduced them to it.

    Mark Spence unpacked his Midwestern anxieties around family and food, Lily
    Waite and Holly Regan opened a door to discuss non-binary and transgender
    issues,  Jerard Fagerberg and Mark LaFaro took big risks to focus us all on
    the dangers and costs of alcoholism, David Jesudason and many others
    captured our attention with stories of harassment, racism, labor abuse, and
    more that so many readers told us were critical and prescient and more
    importantly, helped. These stories helped people.

    Over the years, we’ve had readers cry as they recounted what a story meant
    to them. We’ve had others scream and curse at us for the same. Some even
    went on the record as sources to ensure our reporting had the substance it
    needed to make an impact. Careers were started and ended because of the
    stories we wrote. Those stories had the same effect on ourselves. We’ve had
    writers put something heartbreaking or inspiring into the world only to
    have it wake something up in them and want to do more—take even bigger
    swings —and find a voice within them that carried them far beyond Good Beer
    Hunting.

    And ultimately, that’s where my heart is today.

    This week, I was struggling to find the words to describe what I was going
    to do with Good Beer Hunting—what comes next. I knew what the move was, and
    why, and I knew it was time—but I didn’t have the poetry for it—so I
    couldn’t quite feel it yet.

    On a long drive to rural Michigan to pick up
    my son from summer camp, I was listening to an episode of my favorite
    podcast, On Being. And I heard Azita Ardakani and Janine Benyus, two
    biomimicry specialists who have a way of describing the natural world with
    a stunning relevance. They said:

    “Life is just so full of vitality and so much ON and being alive and then
    it’s not.”

    “…What is the difference between something that’s alive and something
    that’s not? It seems that with the holding on to life —there’s also a
    feeling of once it’s gone, the letting go—like a body breaking down—but it
    doesn’t really. I mean, not for long. What happens is a tree falls and
    eventually becomes a log. Eventually grows a fungus and you think of it as
    breaking down—it is no longer a tree. But then a mouse comes along and it's
    the end of the fungus. And that material—thats’ where the reincarnation
    comes in —that fungus becomes mouse.

    “And then a hawk comes along and the material—that material of that mouse
    becomes hawk. There’s this circulation—called metabolism. It’s
    catabolism—then it gets anabolized up into a new form. The grief is brief
    because transformation happens almost right away—it gets transformed.”

    Now, GBH isn’t dying and it’s not wasting away. The truth is it’s still
    sort of thriving in its own manner of being. It’s a tree taller than I ever
    imagined. But success can kill an organization—I’ve seen it a hundred times
    in the companies I’ve worked for, companies I’ve consulted on—big and
    small. It’s all proportionate. How far away from the roots does that
    beautiful canopy get before it surprises itself with its own extended
    weight? How much life force does it expend trying to prop itself up at the
    expense of something new?

    There’s never an objectively right time—but
    there is a good time. A time not informed by reactionary fear and loathing
    - but by guts, love, and ambition for something new.

    So I’ve decided it’s
    time to take the tree down.

    If I look back over the past few years I can see that Good Beer Hunting
    will be that fallen tree for many. It’ll be a source of nutrients for many
    a mouse that becomes hawk.

    But the truth is, GBH has been the start of a kind of upward anabolism for
    some time now. Jamaal Lemon recently took a dream editors job at the
    Institute of Justice. Stephanie Grant has launched her own community
    project called The Share. Before that, Matthew Curtis started Pellicle Mag
    in the U.K. Lily Waite opened a brewery. So many GBH writers have gone on
    to write books, start podcasts, and create platforms of their own, it’s
    astounding. And what I’m describing right now isn’t something that started
    with GBH—indeed, GBH has been a recipient their upward anabolism from the
    lives they’ve lived—each bringing their own energy and nutrients here and
    nourished us with lifetimes full of curiosity, learning, and love for their
    craft.

    The risks in starting something like Good Beer Hunting are myriad.
    Financial risk is everywhere—but I’ve happily and defiantly borne the brunt
    of it for many years. There’s personal risk—in media, everything you put
    out into the world has a way of coming back to you in unexpected, and often
    dangerous ways. And it does. There’s opportunity risk—if this thing fails,
    and if it takes a long time to fail, what opportunities might you have
    missed out on in the meantime? But to me, the biggest risk of all is it
    just not mattering. Not being relevant. Missing the mark.
    Today, I feel satisfied that Good Beer Hunting matters.

    I have so many people to thank—and so many feelings to share that are best
    relayed one-on-one. It’ll take me many months and years to pass along those
    sentiments to individuals who took that risk with me and succeeded.

    I’m not going to the final word on all this.

    My experience of GBH is singular—being the sole source of continuity over
    those 15 years. But so much of what’s defined GBH have been the
    perspectives and voices of those who’ve invested their talents in it over
    the years. So before our final sign-off this summer, you’ll hear
    reflections from leaders, contributors, partners and friends of Good Beer
    Hunting as well. This is part of the grieving and metabolizing process.

    There are a few more episodes of the podcast to share still, and a few
    remaining stories we’ve been working on that you’ll see this month and
    maybe into August. If you want to stay up to date on future plans, sign up
    for the newsletter.

    This episode—along with all podcast episodes over these many years—was
    edited by Jordan Stalling. And it was scored by my friend, soulmate, and
    composer, Andrew Thioboldeax, who himself has been along for the ride for
    over a decade.

    Aim true, pour liberal folks—have a great rest of the year.
  • On Becoming Hawk
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting12 дней назад
    The definition of “local” can be quite different when the nearest urban
    regions are hundreds of miles away. That’s certainly the case in Jackson,
    Wyoming, where (quote-unquote) neighboring cities like Boise, Idaho;
    Denver, Colorado; and Bozeman, Montana all require a few hours in the car,
    if not on a plane, to get there.

    But it’s precisely that sense of remote grandeur that attracts millions of
    visitors to the Jackson Hole region every year. Where do they go when they
    want a good, local, craft brew? To Snake River Brewing Company, of course,
    which is the oldest operating brewery in the state and celebrates 30 years
    in business in 2024. In this episode, Snake River’s director of sales and
    marketing, Luke Bauer, describes what brought him to Wyoming nearly 20
    years ago, and what kept him coming back after working in Texas, Alaska,
    and Colorado. In addition to his role at Snake River, he’s also on the
    board of the Wyoming Craft Brewers Guild, and shares a first-hand account
    of how the state’s craft beer industry has grown, changed, and evolved,
    especially post-pandemic.

    By his account, Wyoming is a unique place, but also one that’s full of
    surprises. He believes there’s a lot more experimentation than outsiders
    might initially expect from the local beer scene, and explains the big
    differences in style from one side of the state to the other. (Hint: one
    side sticks more to traditional or maltier beers, while the other embraces
    trendier styles like IPAs.) Snake River Brewing has managed to rack up
    awards at the World Beer Cup, including their most recent Bronze medal for
    Zonker Stout, as well as at the Great American Beer Festival, and many more
    over its 30-year tenure. It goes back to their mission statement: “The
    world doesn’t need another beer, but a better beer.” Let’s hear about the
    beer and beyond.
  • EP-418 Luke Bauer of Snake River Brewing Company
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting12 дней назад
    We’re squarely in the midst of political season—presidential debates have
    begun, campaigning has kicked into high gear, and November elections are
    closer than we think. Amongst it all, there’s an adage this episode’s guest
    once shared that likely sounds true, whether your a deep-in-the-weeds
    politico or fair-weather voter: If you want to make the biggest impact in
    politics, you go into business.

    Well over a decade ago, Jon Renthrope did just that, opening up Cajun Fire
    Brewing in his hometown of New Orleans. Enticed by what he found in the
    world of homebrewing, Jon took a degree in politics from the University of
    Florida and spun it into a career in beer, which led to the launch of his
    brewery 12 years ago. And it’s through his company he’s working to marry
    the ideas of community impact with work through local organizations like
    The 100 Black Men of Metro New Orleans, as a cultural ambassador, and by
    working with the National Black Brewers Association.

    In this conversation, you’ll hear Jon talk about what it means to start
    Cajun Fire in the place he grew up and deepen already strong roots. He’ll
    share how he’s been influenced by family—notably his grandmother—and how
    that history lingers today. We also discuss his brewery’s lineup of beer
    and why you won’t find an IPA leading the way among Cajun Fire customers.
    Jon didn’t go into politics, exactly, but he is using his business in all
    kinds of ways to connect and impact people around him.
  • EP-417 Jon Renthrope of Cajun Fire
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting12 дней назад
    It's easy to find examples of what success in entrepreneurship looks like.
    There are dozens of TV shows, thousands of books, and millions of blog
    posts that are meant to share tips, secrets, and let us into the minds of
    people who've made it in all kinds of business. But the fact of the matter
    is that the only ones who can truly understand what it's like—the many
    failures that typically come with a breakout win—are the people who've
    taken a leap of faith without any idea of how their attempt to launch a
    product or start a business will turn out. You're as likely to be built up
    as broken down on this journey.

    In this episode, we spend a lot of time talking about entrepreneurship with
    my friend, Kristen Sumpter, who co-founded bar and bottleshop Red’s Beer
    Garden with her husband, Ed. We’ve gotten to know each other through a
    group she co-founded with past podcast guest Sara Kazmer, which includes
    several women entrepreneurs who live in the Atlanta area. For almost two
    years, I've listened as Kristen has shared the waves of triumphs and
    tribulations of building a beloved local hangout.

    In our conversation, we explore Kristen's journey from that initial spark
    of inspiration to the day-to-day realities of running a successful
    business. You’ll hear her talk about the importance of community, embracing
    vulnerability, and prioritizing self-care amidst the entrepreneurial
    hustle. Kristen also shares how she’s able to show up as her authentic self
    on Instagram and how long she’s been obsessed with hot dogs, a staple of
    the food menu at Red’s.
  • EP-416 Kristen Sumpter of Red's Beer Garden
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting19 дней назад
    Thunderpussy is a band that elicits an immediate, visceral reaction. Even
    their NSFW name is unapologetic, brash, and controversial, and that’s
    exactly how they like it. The Seattle-based rock band launched in 2014 with
    founding members Whitney Petty on guitar and Molly Sides on vocals, and
    today, their all-women lineup also includes bassist Leah Julius and
    drummers Lindsey Elias and Michelle Nuno. We have Whitney with us on the
    podcast to talk about the band’s origins and journey over the past 10
    years, which culminated with a collaborative release with Yonder Cider.

    Caitlin Braam is the founder and CEO of Yonder Cider and The Source,
    Yonder’s sister company that provides custom pressing, juicing, and
    fermenting solutions for cideries around the United States. She joins
    Whitney to talk about Yonder’s first collaboration with a band—what they
    expected, what surprised them, and how the whole thing shook out.
    Thunderpussy happens to be the favorite band of Yonder’s head cider maker,
    Monique Tribble, and the release was an opportunity for everyone to fangirl
    out on one another with delicious results.

    You’ll hear about how both women-led groups have strategically avoided
    dealing with male energy in their often overpoweringly masculine fields of
    music and alcohol, and how even acknowledging that aspect has changed over
    the years. Whitney shares her excitement to dive deeper into the world of
    cider, and echoes the same joy that I think a lot of new cider drinkers are
    surprised to find once they give it a chance. I wouldn’t listen to this
    conversation with kids in the room, so grab some headphones, and maybe a
    cider, and listen in.
  • EP-415 Whitney Petty of Thunderpussy with Caitlin Braam of Yonder Cider
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting21 день назад
    What a long, strange trip it’s been for the Miramar brewing facility that
    once housed Ballast Point and, after changing hands more than a few times,
    is now the centerpiece of West Coast brewing operations for Athletic
    Brewing Company. In this episode of the Gist, lead Sightlines news reporter
    Kate Bernot joins me, Beth Demmon, to talk about the United States’ 10th
    largest craft brewery’s plans both here and abroad, as well as inflation’s
    lingering hold on on-premise brewery sales and the business side of
    celebrity alcohol investments.

    One quick note: as part of the discussion about off-premise NA beer sales
    in the U.S., Kate cites they take up .88 percent of dollar sales. It’s
    actually 8.8 percent, so with that in mind, this is the Gist.
  • TG-017 The One With Celebs
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting22 дня назад
    Some people know early on they’re destined to be their own boss. Rachael
    Hudson is one of these people. She’s the co-owner and head brewer at Pilot
    Brewing Company in Charlotte, North Carolina, a small brewery that’s made
    big waves in her local scene and beyond since opening in 2018. Since then,
    the business has racked up accolades at the Great American Beer Festival,
    the US Open Beer Championship, and the North Carolina Brewers Cup
    Competition, including being named North Carolina Brewery of the Year for
    2023.

    But for as nice as the awards are, Rachael says opening a brewery isn’t
    about fame (and it’s definitely not about money). It’s more about being an
    outlet for her ability and desire to teach curious consumers about what it
    is they’re consuming. She’s an Advanced Cicerone who plans to take the
    Master exam again later this year, as well as a national and international
    beer judge and co-host of the False Bottomed Girls podcast with Master
    Cicerone Jen Blair. Needless to say, she knows what she’s talking about,
    and she’s passionate about sharing her knowledge with absolutely anyone who
    will listen.

    In this episode, Rachael shares when and how she knew she had to go into
    business for herself and why education is such a critical part of what
    Pilot offers to the community. She also talks about her “less is more”
    mentality when it comes to recipe development, and how their ESB tends to
    outshine even their IPAs. Pilot probably isn’t going to get much bigger,
    but that’s not what Rachael wants anyway. She’d rather focus on perfecting
    what they put out and keep figuring out ways to show other people that they
    too can turn their passion into a profession.
  • EP-409 Rachael Hudson of Pilot Brewing Company
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting22 дня назад
    Hillary Barile isn’t sure what she’d call herself first: a farmer or a
    maltster. In reality, she’s both, working as a fifth generation farmer at
    Rabbit Hill Farms & Malthouse in Shiloh, New Jersey. There, she and members
    of her family produce barley and other crops, as well as run a small-scale
    malthouse that supplies ingredients for breweries and distilleries. And, as
    president of the Craft Maltsters Guild Board of Directors, she works to
    educate and grow the craft malt community across North America and beyond.

    So why, and how, did she make the jump from farming potatoes to investing
    in the agriculture and future of craft malt? It started with homebrewing,
    of course, with aspirations of opening a brewery to diversify and solidify
    her farm’s finances. But, as she explains in this episode, the business
    plan never got that far. As for what’s next, she says the breweries
    prioritizing local craft malt can tell unique stories that still reach the
    hearts of drinkers, giving them a small, but sufficient shield against
    difficult economic forces. We also discuss the many definitions of the word
    “sustainable,” and the efforts she’s making to ensure generations to come
    will still have the opportunity to nurture the land her family has
    cultivated.
  • EP-407 Hillary Barile of Rabbit Hill Farms & Malthouse and Craft Maltsters Guild
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting22 дня назад
    Fluffernutter and Oreo Marshmallow pastry stouts. Kettle sours brewed with
    "obscene amounts" of fruit. A cream cheese rangoon gose. Depending on your
    level of curiosity and adventurousness, these beers may sound exciting or
    challenging, but they also have two things in common: They’ve been made by
    Colorado’s WeldWerks Brewing and they’re fun beers made with serious
    intent.

    In this episode, we get into some of the technical ideas, philosophies, and
    search for dialed-in joy with Skip Schwartz, WeldWerks’ head brewer and
    Neil Fisher, founder and owner of the company. What makes brewing and beer
    fun these days? There are lots of answers, and as you’ll hear both explain,
    it could be from the never-ending tweaks to make a beer as perfect as
    possible or finding ways to connect with new drinkers who would otherwise
    turn away from a beer.

    Some of the more wild beers created by WeldWerks have gotten attention over
    the years, but it’s their flagship hazy IPA, Juicy Bits, that put this
    brewery on the map and has allowed WeldWerks to expand into 26 different
    markets this year. The runaway success of Juicy Bits has helped the
    business gain notoriety beyond Colorado, build out its brewhouse, and set a
    goal of modest growth as many companies in craft beer are focused on just
    staying flat with their production.

    So, maybe you’ve tried some of WeldWerks’ outlandish beers at their taproom
    or during a major industry event like the Great American Beer Festival, or
    maybe you’ve had their signature IPA and one of its variants. Allow Skip
    and Neil to give you some background on what it means to connect with
    drinkers today and learn how their approach to beer is setting them up for
    2024 and beyond.
  • EP-403 Neil Fisher and Skip Schwartz of WeldWerks Brewing
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting22 дня назад
    What happens when a respected name in wine and spirits tries to make a move
    into the beer world? Does their experience translate into a new category,
    or do they have to build a reputation from the ground up? Does the beer
    industry welcome interlopers, or view them with skepticism and confusion?
    And if they’re asking to judge your beer at a new competition, does anyone
    show up?

    These are all questions I asked myself when I was invited to judge at The
    Tasting Alliance’s second ever beer competition in December 2023. I, like
    some others in and around beer, had never heard of the group, or only knew
    them for their wine and spirits competitions that take place in San
    Francisco, New York, and Singapore.

    In this episode, I talk to Maddee McDowell, vice president of The Tasting
    Alliance and the person who handles the logistical organization of their
    beer competition. You’ll hear about what it was like for me to participate
    in judging, but also what The Tasting Alliance hopes sets them apart from
    other competitions. Maddee shares what the biggest category of entries was
    (it’s shockingly not IPAs), some of the differences between running wine
    and spirits competitions versus beer, and how they’re trying to build
    relationships in the beer community to gain a wider diversity of palates at
    the judging table. We also talk about how the competition changed from year
    one to two, and how many entries she, somewhat optimistically, hopes to
    receive in year three.

    The competition doesn’t end once medals are announced, McDowell assures us.
    And at the very least, The Tasting Alliance’s experience is another way for
    us to better understand competitions and what it takes to make them happen.
  • EP-405 Maddee McDowell of The Tasting Alliance
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting22 дня назад
    You’ve heard the joke—four scientists walk into a bar, and hilarity ensues.
    But have you heard the one about a few NASA employees opening a brewery?
    It’s not a setup. It’s how True Anomaly Brewing Company in Houston, Texas
    actually started, when four friends and homebrewers decided to trade in the
    final frontier for a shot at making their own beer.

    Michael Duckworth is co-founder and CEO of True Anomaly, which was recently
    named Brewery of the Year at the Texas Craft Brewers Cup for the second
    year in a row. Now in their sixth year, True Anomaly specializes in making
    wild and sour beers, but in a lager-focused state like Texas, they brew
    plenty of clean beers as well. They’ve been recognized for both with medal
    wins in competitions like the World Beer Cup and Great American Beer
    Festival. And now, they’re preparing to open a much larger second location
    later this year, which you’ll hear about, and plan to up their output from
    around 1,200 barrels to around 2,000 by the end of 2024.

    All this begs the question: how did a bunch of NASA nerds pull this off?
    Well, according to Michael, the four founders took a methodical, scientific
    approach to the business plan and applied an artistic sensibility to making
    the beers themselves. Wild beer can be unpredictable, but it’s that freedom
    from expectation he says makes each day a fun and unique surprise. In this
    episode, he also talks about the potential he sees in the Houston craft
    beverage scene, why they implemented inclusivity as part of their
    operations from day one, and why you might see an astronaut or two hanging
    around the brewery on the weekends.
  • EP-406 Michael Duckworth of True Anomaly Brewing Company
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting22 дня назад
    There’s something special about when talent, vision, and respect are all
    wrapped up in a relationship. These attributes can provide people deeper
    meaning and drive which make dreams more attainable. Accomplishing a goal
    can be daunting on your own, but when you have partners who push you to be
    better—and complement each other in meaningful ways—that’s when whole new
    opportunities can come to life.

    These ideas are at the core of this conversation with three co-founders of
    Kansas City’s Vine Street Brewing. The business earned national attention
    last year as Missouri’s first-ever black-owned brewery and from day one has
    backed it up with beloved beer and offering a space that quickly became a
    new and exciting part of the city’s downtown life. Located in the historic
    Jazz District of Kansas City, you’ll find all kinds of community
    connections stemming from the brewery, from beer collaborations, to music
    and film events, and more.

    Joining me to talk about what this means are Kemet Coleman, Elliott Ivory,
    and Woodie Bonds Jr. Each has taken different paths to this moment, but
    their shared connection—whether it be brewing backgrounds with Woodie and
    Elliott or Kemet’s ability to bring people together—has allowed Vine Street
    to not just grow in its first year, but become a celebrated part of the
    Kansas City beer scene. What you’ll hear from them offers a lot of tangible
    examples of what it looks like when talent, vision, and respect turn into
    something you can see, feel, and taste. And as the trio prepares for their
    second year in business, these things also offer them plenty to reflect on
    and use as motivation for Vine Street’s future.
  • EP-413 Kemet Coleman, Elliott Ivory, and Woodie Bonds Jr. of Vine Street Brewing
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting22 дня назад
    “The thicker, the better” sounds like something I would say about my
    thighs, but not necessarily about beer. But that’s exactly how Woven Water
    Brewing Company describes their infamous “fusion” concoctions, which are
    smoothie-style sours with flavors like peanut butter and jelly, banana
    split, and peach orange pop ice cream. That’s not all they brew, but this
    type of eye-catching beverage is what has put the Tampa brewery on the map
    and what owners Jay and Ciara Jones say keep them in business.

    In this episode, I chat with both owners, who launched the brewery with
    Nicole and Eric Childs in August 2020, and have since assumed complete
    ownership. You’ll hear them describe their “adapt or die” mentality, and
    why despite Jay’s initial reluctance to brew what some might call “hype”
    beers or hard seltzers, they quickly realized it’s what people want to
    drink, so why not give it to them? It’s a refreshingly pragmatic approach
    to business, and they’re having fun with it, even hosting a tap takeover of
    the gloopiest, gloppiest beers from around the country in a celebration
    they call Gloop City, which is now in its third year.

    But all silliness aside, this conversation is a look at a brewery that was
    poised to launch at the start of the pandemic, and what they had to do and
    change in order to open in what they believe is the best craft beer scene
    in the country. They share what worked, what didn’t, what they would do
    differently if they had to do it all over again, and what they hope to
    accomplish in the future. Jay and Ciara say they’re investing in a few key
    areas: their people, their community, and in their ability to grow and
    change. That sounds like a solid plan to me. So, let’s hear about it, right
    now.
  • EP-411 Jay & Ciara Jones of Woven Water Brewing Company
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Hunting22 дня назад
    The idea of “community” comes up a lot in beer. We use “community” to
    describe the collection of homebrewers, enthusiasts, brewery employees,
    journalists, and more that surround the industry. Many owners position
    their taprooms as “community spaces.” This aspect of bringing people
    together is one of my favorite parts of beer, but once we’re all gathered,
    what else can we do besides enjoy a drink together? Is there a way for us
    to make an impact or drive change?

    To explore these questions, I’m joined by Dan Reingold, marketing director
    at Creature Comforts Brewing, a business that has become a cornerstone of
    its local community in Athens, Georgia. Over the past decade, the company
    has grown to be much more than a place to enjoy a pint—it's a hub for
    community engagement and social good. As one of Creature’s oldest
    employees, Dan is able to give us a glimpse of those early days and also
    show us what the brewery has been up to lately.

    In our conversation, Dan shares the excitement of celebrating Creature
    Comforts’ 10th anniversary with the declaration of “Creature Comforts Day.”
    You’ll hear about the brewery’s impactful “Get Comfortable” program, which
    has led to the business receiving the President's Volunteer Service Award.
    Dan also discusses the brewery’s collaborative initiatives with local
    institutions like the University of Georgia, and how important it is for
    them to use business to address community needs.
  • EP-414 Dan Reingold of Creature Comforts Brewing
  • Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Huntingв прошлом месяце
    There’s something special about when talent, vision, and respect are all wrapped up in a relationship. These attributes can provide people deeper meaning and drive which make dreams more attainable. Accomplishing a goal can be daunting on your own, but when you have partners who push you to be better—and complement each other in meaningful ways—that’s when whole new opportunities can come to life. These ideas are at the core of this conversation with three co-founders of Kansas City’s Vine Street Brewing. The business earned national attention last year as Missouri’s first-ever black-owned brewery and from day one has backed it up with beloved beer and offering a space that quickly became a new and exciting part of the city’s downtown life. Located in the historic Jazz District of Kansas City, you’ll find all kinds of community connections stemming from the brewery, from beer collaborations, to music and film events, and more. Joining me to talk about what this means are Kemet Coleman, Elliott Ivory, and Woodie Bonds Jr. Each has taken different paths to this moment, but their shared connection—whether it be brewing backgrounds with Woodie and Elliott or Kemet’s ability to bring people together—has allowed Vine Street to not just grow in its first year, but become a celebrated part of the Kansas City beer scene. What you’ll hear from them offers a lot of tangible examples of what it looks like when talent, vision, and respect turn into something you can see, feel, and taste. And as the trio prepares for their second year in business, these things also offer them plenty to reflect on and use as motivation for Vine Street’s future.
    Good Beer Huntingдобавил аудиокнигу на полкуPodcast: Good Beer Huntingв прошлом месяце
    Listeners of The Gist know we’re all about the stats. But today, we’re dishing out numbers with narrative, from Anchor Brewing's out-of-nowhere yogurt angel to speculation about a potential Boston Beer Company sale and wine’s latest numbers and what they really mean. I’m Beth Demmon with Kate Bernot, and this is The Gist.
fb2epub
Перетащите файлы сюда, не более 5 за один раз